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dc.creatorKokwaro, G.
dc.creatorMuchohi, Simon N.
dc.creatorThuo, Nahashon
dc.creatorKarisa, Japhet
dc.creatorMuturi, Alex
dc.creatorMaitland, Kathryn
dc.date03/11/2015
dc.dateWed, 11 Mar 2015
dc.dateWed, 11 Mar 2015 19:20:25
dc.dateMonth: 1 Day: 15 Year: 2011
dc.dateWed, 11 Mar 2015 19:20:25
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-18T11:29:17Z
dc.date.available2015-03-18T11:29:17Z
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/3858
dc.identifier
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/3858
dc.descriptionArticle published in Journal of Chromatography B
dc.descriptionClinical pharmacokinetic studies of ciprofloxacin require accurate and precise measurement of plasma drug concentrations. We describe a rapid, selective and sensitive HPLC method coupled with fluorescence detection for determination of ciprofloxacin in human plasma. Internal standard (IS; sarafloxacin) was added to plasma aliquots (200uL) prior to protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Ciprofloxacin and IS were eluted on a Synergi Max-RP analytical column (150mm×4.6mm i.d., 5um particle size) maintained at 40 ◦C. The mobile phase comprised a mixture of aqueous orthophosphoric acid (0.025 M)/methanol/acetonitrile (75/13/12%, v/v/v); the pH was adjusted to 3.0 with triethylamine. A fluorescence detector (excitation/emission wavelength of 278/450 nm) was used. Retention times for ciprofloxacin and IS were approximately 3.6 and 7.0 min, respectively. Calibration curves of ciprofloxacin were linear over the concentration range of 0.02–4ug/mL, with correlation coefficients (r2)≥0.998. Intraand inter-assay relative standard deviations (SD) were <8.0% and accuracy values ranged from 93% to 105% for quality control samples (0.2, 1.8 and 3.6ug/mL). The mean (SD) extraction recoveries for ciprofloxacin from spiked plasma at 0.08, 1.8 and 3.6ug/mL were 72.8±12.5% (n = 5), 83.5±5.2% and 77.7±2.0%, respectively (n = 8 in both cases). The recovery for IS was 94.5±7.9% (n = 15). The limits of detection and quantification were 10 ng/mL and 20 ng/mL, respectively. Ciprofloxacin was stable in plasma for at least one month when stored at −15 ◦C to −25 ◦C and −70 ◦C to −90 ◦C. This method was successfully applied to measure plasma ciprofloxacin concentrations in a population pharmacokinetics study of ciprofloxacin in malnourished children.
dc.description.abstractClinical pharmacokinetic studies of ciprofloxacin require accurate and precise measurement of plasma drug concentrations. We describe a rapid, selective and sensitive HPLC method coupled with fluorescence detection for determination of ciprofloxacin in human plasma. Internal standard (IS; sarafloxacin) was added to plasma aliquots (200uL) prior to protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Ciprofloxacin and IS were eluted on a Synergi Max-RP analytical column (150mm×4.6mm i.d., 5um particle size) maintained at 40 ◦C. The mobile phase comprised a mixture of aqueous orthophosphoric acid (0.025 M)/methanol/acetonitrile (75/13/12%, v/v/v); the pH was adjusted to 3.0 with triethylamine. A fluorescence detector (excitation/emission wavelength of 278/450 nm) was used. Retention times for ciprofloxacin and IS were approximately 3.6 and 7.0 min, respectively. Calibration curves of ciprofloxacin were linear over the concentration range of 0.02–4ug/mL, with correlation coefficients (r2)≥0.998. Intraand inter-assay relative standard deviations (SD) were <8.0% and accuracy values ranged from 93% to 105% for quality control samples (0.2, 1.8 and 3.6ug/mL). The mean (SD) extraction recoveries for ciprofloxacin from spiked plasma at 0.08, 1.8 and 3.6ug/mL were 72.8±12.5% (n = 5), 83.5±5.2% and 77.7±2.0%, respectively (n = 8 in both cases). The recovery for IS was 94.5±7.9% (n = 15). The limits of detection and quantification were 10 ng/mL and 20 ng/mL, respectively. Ciprofloxacin was stable in plasma for at least one month when stored at −15 ◦C to −25 ◦C and −70 ◦C to −90 ◦C. This method was successfully applied to measure plasma ciprofloxacin concentrations in a population pharmacokinetics study of ciprofloxacin in malnourished children.
dc.formatVolume Number:879
dc.formatIssue No.:2
dc.formatPages:146 – 152
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherJournal of Chromatography B
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dc.subjectCiprofloxacin
dc.subjectHPLC fluorescence detection
dc.subjectPlasma
dc.subjectProtein precipitation
dc.subjectValidation
dc.titleDetermination of ciprofloxacin in human plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection: Application to a population pharmacokinetics study in children with severe malnutrition
dc.typeArticle


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