Editorial - Strathmore Law Journal

dc.contributor.advisor
dc.contributor.authorAmbani, J Osogo
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-26T14:53:20Z
dc.date.available2016-07-26T14:53:20Z
dc.date.issued2015-06
dc.descriptionEditorial information for the Strathmore Law Journal, Volume 1, Number 1, June 2015.en_US
dc.description.abstractUsers of academic research outputs will easily agree with me that compared to our Western counterparts, very little has been published on African law and the law in Africa North of River Limpopo. Researchers enquiring into any subject of law in Africa soon realize that literature in the area is marginal. This makes Africa a huge grey intellectual area. There are also complaints that there is a systemic marginalization of native African scholarship in leading academic forums to the extent that a consumer of the numerous works published in Western intellectual capitals may be excused for assuming that very little knowledge is generated on our continent. There may thus exist a paradoxical dual vacuum in African scholarship; the dearth of African literature, and a curious disregard for existing African contributions in foreign platforms.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/4681
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherStrathmore University Pressen_US
dc.subjectAcademic research outputsen_US
dc.subjectAfrican lawen_US
dc.subjectStrathmore Law Journal (SLJ)en_US
dc.titleEditorial - Strathmore Law Journalen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
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