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dc.contributor.authorGichuhi, Tabitha Mumbi
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-15T05:13:34Z
dc.date.available2018-11-15T05:13:34Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/6160
dc.descriptionSubmitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Bachelor of Laws Degree, Strathmore University Law Schoolen_US
dc.description.abstractAmong the reasons why Africans are le.fi without a nationality is the colonial history of their respective states. Following the attainment of independence, these newly independent African states had to grapple with the formulation of citizenship laws that would apply to political units comprising of people from different cultures, religions and languages. In a bid to achieve this, governments had to decide whether to grant citizenship on the basis of the law of descent (jus sanguinis) or the law of the soil (jus soli). The general objective of this paper is to investigate the motivations that would lead a state to choose either mode of granting citizenship as well as its resultant effect on the creation of statelessness. it will additionally look into the nation-building processes of Kenya and Tanzania, which apply Jus sanguinis and jus soli respectively, as well as their citizenship policies before and after the attainment of independence. This examination hopes to eventually determine whether these policies, from the point of state succession, have lived up to the obligation to grant nationality to persons within their territories and prevent the occurrence of statelessnessen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherStrathmore Universityen_US
dc.subjectJus-sanguinisen_US
dc.subjectStatelessnessen_US
dc.subjectPost -colonialen_US
dc.subjectCitizenship lawsen_US
dc.titleThe Application of Jus-sanguinis during post -colonial state succession and the creation of statelessness: a comparative study of Kenya and Tanzania.en_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US


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