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dc.contributor.authorOwuor, Georgina Agola
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-13T06:56:20Z
dc.date.available2018-11-13T06:56:20Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/6135
dc.descriptionSubmitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Bachelor of Laws Degree, Strathmore University Law Schoolen_US
dc.description.abstractSurrogacy motherhood, an arrangement involving one woman gestating a baby to be raised by another, is still a relatively 'new' technology in Kenya seeing as the first surrogate birth in Kenya happened in August 2007. Indeed, it is still a new technology in Kenya and this leaves a lot of legal and ethical issues that have not been addressed. The fact that there is no legal and ethical framework to regulate surrogacy arrangements in Kenya, exposes the practice to corruption and other exploitative activities. Lacunas in the legal framework makes it hard to standardize the practice of surrogacy in Kenya, leaving the consumers of the service especially surrogate mothers.at the mercy of the medical doctors as well as the biological parents that have commissioned them. This research seeks to address the lacunas found in the law, how they adversely affect the surrogate mothers and finally, what strides Kenya can take to ensure that there is no exploitation of surrogate mothers that may lead to commodification of their body parts as child trafficking among other atrocities.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherStrathmore Universityen_US
dc.subjectSurrogate Mothersen_US
dc.subjectSurrogacy Agreementen_US
dc.subjectSurrogacy Practicesen_US
dc.subjectIn-Vitro Fertilization Billen_US
dc.titleProtection of surrogate mothers against exploitation of their reproductive organs in Kenyaen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US


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