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dc.contributor.authorGachenga, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.editorPaul Martin
dc.contributor.editorSadeq Z. Bigdeli
dc.contributor.editorTrevor Daya-Winterbottom
dc.contributor.editorWillemien du Plessis
dc.contributor.editorAmanda Kennedy
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-08T09:39:35Z
dc.date.available2016-03-08T09:39:35Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.isbn978-99916-39-10-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/4306
dc.descriptionBook Chapteren_US
dc.description.abstractEnergy security is one of the most important future challenges for the international agenda of security, peace, and stability worldwide. Increasing energy supply needs and the aim of achieving greater energy independence are playing a mounting role in politics, not only in the United States, Europe, Russia, China and India, but also in Africa as the continent with the highest potential for energy resources for the future. The quest for control and commercialisation of energy resources is also a reality in sub-Saharan Africa. Nigeria and Angola are the biggest oil-exporting countries after the countries of the Middle East. Namibia is one of the biggest uranium-exploiting countries, while Tanzania may in future become one of the most important gas-exporting African countries to world markets. The United Nations forecasts that the African population will be around 2 billion people in 2050, and therefore the expanding demand for energy will be one of the challenges with which Africa is faced, along with poverty reduction, food security, water security and combating the impacts of climate change. But Africa’s challenges are also world challenges, because energy security is a global priority, with global markets, interests and needs. More than ever, a reliable discussion about the importance of coordinating secure energy supplies worldwide, and especially the impact on Africa, is essential for the future of this continent, as part of the international energy security structure. The African Union represents a continent which is faced with different aims, security interests and needs, if one compares the destabilising developments over the past 10 years in the north, south, east and west of Africa. Which path will Africa take in respect of rapidly growing energy demands on the continent – the European or the Asian path?en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMacmillan Education Namibiaen_US
dc.subjectRenewable energyen_US
dc.subjectSub-sahara Africaen_US
dc.subjectEnergy securityen_US
dc.subjectLegal and Policy frameworken_US
dc.subjectClimate-friendly energyen_US
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmenten_US
dc.titleLegal and policy frameworks for climate-friendly energy generation in Africa : energy security for future developmenten_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US


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