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dc.creatorKokwaro, G.
dc.creatorGitau, Evelyn N
dc.creatorKaranja, Henry
dc.creatorNewton, Charles
dc.creatorWard, Stephen A
dc.date03/11/2015
dc.dateWed, 11 Mar 2015
dc.dateWed, 11 Mar 2015 19:41:00
dc.dateMonth: 7 Day: 25 Year: 2013
dc.dateWed, 11 Mar 2015 19:41:00
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-18T11:29:17Z
dc.date.available2015-03-18T11:29:17Z
dc.identifier10.1093/infdis/jit334
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/3859
dc.identifier
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/3859
dc.descriptionJournal article published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases
dc.descriptionClinical signs and symptoms of cerebral malaria in children are nonspecific and are seen in other common encephalopathies in malaria-endemic areas. This makes accurate diagnosis difficult in resource-poor settings. Novel malaria-specific diagnostic and prognostic methods are needed. We have used 2 proteomic strategies to identify differentially expressed proteins in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid from children with a diagnosis of cerebral malaria, compared with those with a diagnosis of malaria-slide-negative acute bacterial meningitis and other nonspecific encephalopathies. Here we report the presence of differentially expressed proteins in cerebral malaria in both plasma and cerebrospinal fluid that could be used to better understand pathogenesis and help develop more-specific diagnostic methods. In particular, we report the expression of 2 spectrin proteins that have known Plasmodium falciparum–binding partners involved in the stability of the infected red blood cell, suppressing further invasion and possibly enhancing the red blood cell’s ability to sequester in microvasculature.
dc.description.abstractClinical signs and symptoms of cerebral malaria in children are nonspecific and are seen in other common encephalopathies in malaria-endemic areas. This makes accurate diagnosis difficult in resource-poor settings. Novel malaria-specific diagnostic and prognostic methods are needed. We have used 2 proteomic strategies to identify differentially expressed proteins in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid from children with a diagnosis of cerebral malaria, compared with those with a diagnosis of malaria-slide-negative acute bacterial meningitis and other nonspecific encephalopathies. Here we report the presence of differentially expressed proteins in cerebral malaria in both plasma and cerebrospinal fluid that could be used to better understand pathogenesis and help develop more-specific diagnostic methods. In particular, we report the expression of 2 spectrin proteins that have known Plasmodium falciparum–binding partners involved in the stability of the infected red blood cell, suppressing further invasion and possibly enhancing the red blood cell’s ability to sequester in microvasculature.
dc.formatVolume Number:208
dc.formatIssue No.:9
dc.formatPages:1494 - 1503
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherThe Journal of Infectious Diseases
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dc.subjectproteomics
dc.subjectP. falciparum
dc.subjectcerebral malaria
dc.subjectspectrin
dc.subjectplatelet activation
dc.titlePlasma and cerebrospinal proteomes from childre with cerebral malaria differ from those of children with other encephalopathies
dc.typeArticle


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