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dc.creatorNyandiere Clement M,
dc.date09/07/2012
dc.dateFri, 7 Sep 2012
dc.dateFri, 7 Sep 2012 11:46:02
dc.dateFri, 7 Sep 2012 11:46:02
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-18T11:28:32Z
dc.date.available2015-03-18T11:28:32Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/3199
dc.descriptionPaper presented at ICT conference of 2007. Theme : Managing and Measuring ICT in Business and Education
dc.descriptionTrends across the world show a growing demand for information systems for educational institutions. Many of them have been running manual systems, pushing paperwork, for ages. They have had cumbersome working procedures and this has led to low productivity occasioned by highly inept manual systems. Many of the higher educational instructions (HEIs) have implemented one form of computer-based information system (CIS) or other to manage their academic and management needs. But why are our HEIs turning to computerised information systems? There is a general demand on institutional managers to deliver high quality service; there is increasing need for management productivity; efficiency brought about by the systems; there is the increased recognition of information as an important corporate resource that is key to good decision making in a competitive and ever dynamic environment; and technologyhardware, software, telecommunications and related technologies- is now fairly priced and therefore more affordable to many institutions. However, as the HEIs quest for information systems implementation, they face a number of challenges to overcome which include lack of awareness and mindset among staff; lack of top level management commitment thus bringing forth bureaucracies and red-tape in system implementation; lack of appreciation of ICT as a tool and not panacea for organizational transformation; poor strategy in making ICT responsive to the organizational vision and mission; lack of a systematic method of system implementation; lack of project ownership- all employees and users must be involved in system implementation; inhibiting initial costs of hardware and software and funding for sustainability and continuity in maintenance, replacement of equipment and emolument of ICT staff who maintain the systems, among others. This paper identifies strategic management of organizations, strategic ICT planning, and integration of ICT in the management of HEIs as key ways of overcoming some of the challenges that HEIs face in their effort to implement systems in the institutions.
dc.description.abstractTrends across the world show a growing demand for information systems for educational institutions. Many of them have been running manual systems, pushing paperwork, for ages. They have had cumbersome working procedures and this has led to low productivity occasioned by highly inept manual systems. Many of the higher educational instructions (HEIs) have implemented one form of computer-based information system (CIS) or other to manage their academic and management needs. But why are our HEIs turning to computerised information systems? There is a general demand on institutional managers to deliver high quality service; there is increasing need for management productivity; efficiency brought about by the systems; there is the increased recognition of information as an important corporate resource that is key to good decision making in a competitive and ever dynamic environment; and technologyhardware, software, telecommunications and related technologies- is now fairly priced and therefore more affordable to many institutions. However, as the HEIs quest for information systems implementation, they face a number of challenges to overcome which include lack of awareness and mindset among staff; lack of top level management commitment thus bringing forth bureaucracies and red-tape in system implementation; lack of appreciation of ICT as a tool and not panacea for organizational transformation; poor strategy in making ICT responsive to the organizational vision and mission; lack of a systematic method of system implementation; lack of project ownership- all employees and users must be involved in system implementation; inhibiting initial costs of hardware and software and funding for sustainability and continuity in maintenance, replacement of equipment and emolument of ICT staff who maintain the systems, among others. This paper identifies strategic management of organizations, strategic ICT planning, and integration of ICT in the management of HEIs as key ways of overcoming some of the challenges that HEIs face in their effort to implement systems in the institutions.
dc.formatNumber of Pages:17 p.
dc.languageeng
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dc.subjectICT Training
dc.subjectICT Job Opportunities
dc.titleICT graduates and their placement: case of strathmore university
dc.typeLearning Object
dc.typePresentation


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  • SICT 2006 [14]
    7th Strathmore ICT Conference

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