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dc.contributor.authorMussa, Ahliya Ameerali
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-04T08:27:38Z
dc.date.available2019-02-04T08:27:38Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/6352
dc.descriptionSubmitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Bachelor of Laws Degree, Strathmore University Law Schoolen_US
dc.description.abstractThis research paper intends to demonstrate that essential medicines on patent do pose a barrier to access in terms of affordability. The research undertaken provides some empirical evidence on the prices of essential medicines that are on patent. The focus of this is to show how patented medicines when sold in generic forms often prove to be much cheaper than the original form of medicines. The research, then, delves into the various agreements and laws such as the TRIPS agreement and the Industrial Property Act that provide for flexibilities such as compulsory licensing. The research then discusses how Kenya needs to make its IP rights regime more transparent and the need for putting up measures to prevent situations of ever greening. In conclusion IP rights do pose a barrier to access for essential medicines since branded medicines are much more expensive then generic medicines.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherStrathmore Universityen_US
dc.subjectIP rightsen_US
dc.subjectMedicine_Kenyaen_US
dc.subjectIndustrial Property Acten_US
dc.titleIP rights related to medicine - are IP rights an impediment for accessing essential medicines in Kenyaen_US
dc.typeUndergraduate projecten_US


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