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dc.contributor.authorAmbani, Osogo J
dc.contributor.authorAhaya, Ochieng
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-26T13:36:13Z
dc.date.available2016-07-26T13:36:13Z
dc.date.issued2015-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/4680
dc.descriptionA journal article published in Strathmore Law Journal, SLJ Volume 1, Number 1, June 2015.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe modern African judge will be the first to acknowledge that, in many senses, the problems faced by British judges in colonial Africa have not vanished. Almost one hundred percent of the African judiciary is now African. But even though there is no longer the gross disparity of national origin between a judge and his community, a judge often does not come from the particular locality whose ethnic law he is administering. A part from this ethnic question, there is an enormous educational and cultural gap between a senior judge with a western education and the ordinary families he may deal with. Thus, the judicial system may have moved from a problem of race and ethnicity to one of class.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherStrathmore University Pressen_US
dc.subjectAfrican traditionalistsen_US
dc.subjectKenyaen_US
dc.subjectCustomary lawen_US
dc.subjectNew constitutional eraen_US
dc.subjectJudgeen_US
dc.titleThe wretched african traditionalists in Kenya - The challenges and prospects of customary law in the new constitutional eraen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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