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dc.creatorMusangi, Peninnah Syombua
dc.date11/05/2014
dc.dateWed, 5 Nov 2014
dc.dateMon, 5 Nov 2012 13:54:45
dc.dateFri, 11 Jan 2013 13:41:09
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-18T11:28:45Z
dc.date.available2015-03-18T11:28:45Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/3370
dc.descriptionConference paper presented at the 8th Annual International conference Moi University
dc.descriptionTraditional models of libraries offering information services are not working for current generation of students. Robinson (2008) discusses the current generation of undergraduate and graduate students as being digital natives. These digital natives have grown up in an environment surrounded by rapidly evolving technologies. This means that today’s academic library users think about technology and information differently than previous generations, and expect instant access to information. I can term them to be ‘netGen’ users. With this, academic libraries need to evolve by changing to user-oriented services, allowing users to participate in the creation of content, keeping the users constantly updated and building services based on users’ feedback. To achieve this, libraries need to incorporate web 2.0 tools in the way they provide services to their users. Some of the tools to take advantage of include creation of blogs, wikis, flickr, youtube, facebook, RSS feeds, and slideshare among others. Another obvious change noted today is the development of university campuses all over the country. For an institution of higher learning, a library is fundamental. For most of these campuses, one will find small rooms as libraries; with minimal resources and a few staff members. This is a challenge and Library 2.0 being a combination of both physical and virtual spaces and services can offer solution to such campuses. Nowadays many universities are offering distance learning and evening programmes to cater for the working class people who want to advance their careers. Do they have to come all the way to visit the library to get information for their studies? No. Library 2.0 is their way out and therefore academic libraries have to invest in these tools, in addition to off-campus access to e-resources. This paper will discuss library 2.0 as the new model of information provision to library users and especially in the academic world. The library 2.0 tools and technologies will be discussed and how they can be applied in an academic library.
dc.description.abstractTraditional models of libraries offering information services are not working for current generation of students. Robinson (2008) discusses the current generation of undergraduate and graduate students as being digital natives. These digital natives have grown up in an environment surrounded by rapidly evolving technologies. This means that today‟s academic library users think about technology and information differently than previous generations, and expect instant access to information. I can term them to be „netGen‟ users. With this, academic libraries need to evolve by changing to user-oriented services, allowing users to participate in the creation of content, keeping the users constantly updated and building services based on users‟ feedback. To achieve this, libraries need to incorporate web 2.0 tools in the way they provide services to their users. Some of the tools to take advantage of include creation of blogs, wikis, flickr, youtube, facebook, RSS feeds, and slideshare among others. Another obvious change noted today is the development of university campuses all over the country. For an institution of higher learning, a library is fundamental. For most of these campuses, one will find small rooms as libraries; with minimal resources and a few staff members. This is a challenge and Library 2.0 being a combination of both physical and virtual spaces and services can offer solution to such campuses. Nowadays many universities are offering distance learning and evening programmes to cater for the working class people who want to advance their careers. Do they have to come all the way to visit the library to get information for their studies? No. Library 2.0 is their way out and therefore academic libraries have to invest in these tools, in addition to off-campus access to e-resources. This paper will discuss library 2.0 as the new model of information provision to library users and especially in the academic world. The library 2.0 tools and technologies will be discussed and how they can be applied in an academic library.
dc.formatNumber of Pages:14 p.
dc.languageeng
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dc.subjectLibrary 2.0
dc.subjectWeb 2.0
dc.subjectAcademic libraries
dc.subjectLibrary service models
dc.subjectInformation services
dc.titleLibrary 2.0 and the changing landscape of information services in academic libraries
dc.typePresentation
dc.typeConference Paper


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    Assorted scholarly writings by University Staff outside of specific faculty affiliation

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