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dc.contributor.authorODAWA, BERTHA MARY
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-21T23:21:18Z
dc.date.available2021-12-21T23:21:18Z
dc.date.issued2021-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/12472
dc.descriptionArguably, work is one of the characteristics that distinguishes human nature. In the animal kingdom, all the other activities by the rest of the species for the purposes of sustaining their lives may not be considered as work. Lee looks into the relationship between emotions and work by pointing to the fact that work is an important source of non-economic well-being for the human person. In light of this fact, the theory of non-commodification, as discussed by David Beatty is brought to light as he states that, apart from labour’s productive functions, it gives a person a sense of identity and meaning, allowing them to secure their self-respect and self-esteem.3 Owing to the fact that a human being has such an intimate relationship with work, it is important to look at all the aspects of work, including, the laws that regulate work, to ensure that they fully encompass the concept of human dignity.en_US
dc.description.abstractPsychosocial workplace hazards are an emerging occupational safety and health risk that is largely associated with the mental health of workers. Labour law spanning from a global to a local arena, it is paramount to then analyse the place of these hazards under the law. Focusing on the Kenyan scene, the study aims at the acknowledgement of the existence of these risks, the investigation of their possible causes and negative impact, the extent of their regulation and the recommendation of possible solutions.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherStrathmore Universityen_US
dc.titleThe right to reasonable working conditions: regulation of psychosocial workplace hazards in Kenyaen_US
dc.typeLearning Objecten_US


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