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dc.contributor.authorNyangi, Yvonne Wambui
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-16T21:12:52Z
dc.date.available2021-12-16T21:12:52Z
dc.date.issued2021-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/12338
dc.descriptionDecolonization efforts derive from the principle of ‘equal rights and self-determination of people.1 Without a doubt, the development of the peoples’ right to self-determination has a special place in the corpus of international law.2 From its inclusion in the United Nations Charter, the concept of self-determination has evolved from a legal principle to a right of peoples that is not only invoked in the decolonization context but also post-colonially.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe concepts of equal sovereignty and territorial integrity have formed the bedrock of delegitimizing imperial rule. Despite some success of the decolonization movement, colonial rule endures in territories such as the Chagos Islands. The Islands were detached from the colony of Mauritius following an unconsented agreement between the United Kingdom and Mauritius. Later on, the UK engineered the transfer of Diego Garcia – the largest island on the Chagos Archipelago – to the US for the establishment of a military base. In February 2019, the ICJ issued an Advisory Opinion that rendered the continued colonial administration of the Islands by the UK unlawful.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherStrathmore Universityen_US
dc.titleA critical appraisal of Chagos Advisory Opinion rendered by the International Court of Justiceen_US
dc.typeLearning Objecten_US


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