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dc.contributor.authorMacharia, Mukono
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-16T09:27:27Z
dc.date.available2021-12-16T09:27:27Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11071/12301
dc.descriptionSubmitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the Bachelor of Laws Degree, Strathmore University Law Schoolen_US
dc.description.abstractThe period leading up to the enactment of the Sexual Offences Act (hereafter SOA) were troubled times – particularly for women. As Hon. Njoki Ndung’u put it, the country was at war with sexual violence.Statistics at the time showed that between the period of 2003 and 2005, over 2,000 sexual violence offences had been reported at the Gender Violence Recovery Centre. Of these, 944 involved victims who were 15 years or younger. The objectification of women, improper deterrence mechanisms, insensitivity of law enforcement officers and judicial laxity in the punishment of sexual offenders were among the reasons given as necessitating reform to the legal framework governing sexual offences in Kenya. The system at the time; for example, classified rape and sexual assaults as crimes against morality meaning that they carried lighter sentences in comparison to offences on the person of another. The law also inadequately catered for conventional issues of the time such as the spread of HIV/AIDS and the onset of child sex tourism among other forms of sexual offences.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherStrathmore Universityen_US
dc.titleRomeo and Juliet laws: Protecting Kenya’s consenting adolescentsen_US
dc.typeUndergraduate projecten_US


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